The Longest Day

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A riveting historical accounting of World War 2’s  D-Day invasion. Ryan is careful to provide the reader with all the significant data of this fateful day. (How many dead, how many boats, what the tides were like, etc.) However, Ryan’s book becomes a classic in my estimation not for it’s rigorous accounting of information, rather it’s his masterful retelling of so many individual stories of battle and struggle. This feature made it impossible for me to put the book down. A paratrooper landing in the water, doomed to drown until a mysterious wind fills his shoot and bounces him along the water like a skipping stone to safety. A paratrooper  playing dead as he hung from a bell tower in a small french town. A chance face to face meeting in the middle of the night between a German and an American, they both freeze, finally the German fires off a shot, it ricochets off the American’s gun and they both run off unhurt.  All of the stories come by way of personal interviews and diligent research. Another of this books great assets is it’s diligent work to recount the German side of the story. If anyone is interested in this incredible day, it would be a great loss for them not to read this book.

Jesus: Maniac or Messiah?

 “If you love your father or mother more than you love me, you are not worthy of being mine; or if you love your son or daughter more than me, you are not worthy of being mine.”

These are the words of either an egomaniac or the Messiah — this Jewish Carpenter is demanding that our love and allegiance to him be greater than our love for our own parents and our allegiance to our own children! No one should say such things. But yet Jesus says them unashamedly!Clearly Jesus has an incredibly high opinion of himself. Is this self glorying opinion warranted ? Well that’s the question isn’t it? If he is the perfect one, the Divine Savior of the world, then yes, our allegiance to him should surpass any human allegiances. If he’s just a guy with some good talk and a bag of magic tricks we would be idiots to follow him.

The Unquenchable Flame (Book Review)

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The Church was a mess in the 1400’s, corrupt, lazy, bloated with arrogance and drunk on power. Rumblings were inevitable. Had the Roman Catholic church listened and responded to the complaints history would have told a different story.

Erasmus was disenchanted, but he wanted peace more than anything. To him peace was best obtainable through theological ignorance:

“The sum of our religion is peace and unanimity, but these can scarcely stand unless we define as little as possible” 

That was the Catholic churches party line, its just that for Erasmus they needed to clean up their act a lot. This wasn’t good enough for Luther, he fired back at Erasmus:

“You with your peace-loving theology you don’t care about truth” 

Luther won the debate and Europe was plunged into about 400 years of bloody religious conflict. Why? The answer is complicated, but the following points offer at least a partial answer:

  1. Religious upheaval was a prime opportunity for ambitious aristocrats and royals to accrue power. — There is nothing like a religious reason to motivate ones subjects to fight and conquer.
  2. The reformers were not proponents of individual religious liberty. Dissenting voices must still be crushed whether Reformer or Catholic.
  3. The accessibility of Scripture to the general public created dissenting voices on a massive scale.
  4. As the tyranny of the Catholic system was cast off, many marginalized people took this opportunity to cast off any and all authority. Rebellions were always met with brutality in that era.
  5. Belief is worth dying for. In this era nothing mattered more. But was belief worth killing for? Sadly, many answered that question (contrary to Jesus) in the affirmative.

If God had spoken, and if the human had somehow missed the message or clouded it beyond recognition as the reformers said, then it was necessary to go through this tumult. However, it is regrettable that so much blood had to be shed.

As a way to cope with our differences on the other side of the reformation we embraced individual religious liberty. We made faith a volunteer experience. The upside of this is we don’t battle each other any more. The downside is that confidence in the reality of God has been lost. The thinking goes as follows: If there are so many possibilities of belief, how can we know which one is actually real, we can’t. Therefore it’s all probably just made up stuff anyway. Doubt permeates our thinking, dogmatism must go and with it, in the long run, faith itself — Such seems to be the case in the West. As a matter of survival perhaps, it appears to me that Christianity is becoming more and more like Erasmus’s vision of it and less like Luther’s.

Avoiding the pitfalls of self inflation

  
In the Biblical record of Jewish kings we see leader after leader succumbing to self absorption and then ruining all things good. Power invariably inflates our view of self, which results in human suffering. This isn’t just a localized problem that ancient Jewish kings experienced. This is every humans problem. It’s the story of human history! As I have read The History of the Medival World by Susan Wise Bauer this truth is the one constant.

What protections do I have against the corrupting nature of power?

1) Embrace  A worldview that demands humility  — I believe that I am one who is broken, in need of a Saviour, I am the recipient of mercy, grace, and forgiveness.

2) Embrace a lifestyle that seeks service as the greatest form of leadership  – “I am amoung you as one who serves” says Jesus, this “be great by serving others” model of living is exactly what Jesus attempted to instill in his followers.

3) Embrace a worship that exalts what is truly glorious. For the Christian, God is the creator and redeemer, the one who truly helps us and the one who will ultimately restore all the broken things in our lives and in this world. This God alone is worthy of the greatest praise. To celebrate the goodness of God in all things is of tremendous assistance when wanting to avoid the all to natural tendency towards self inflation.

The Journey Into Belief

  

…And his disciples believed in him

(John 2:11)

The celebration was far from over but the wine barrels were empty. Jesus managed to fix the problem in ways that bend the laws of nature!  Confidence began to grow in the hearts of Jesus’ friends.  Maybe, just maybe, Jesus was the Messiah. If he can take care of a wine problem, maybe he can take care of all of our problems. At this point in the story, they didn’t even know what that would look like, they had no idea of exactly who Jesus was, only that a seed of hope had begun to root itself in this mysterious yet approachable person named Jesus.  Belief is the slow process in which over time ones hopes are transferred. Helping someone cross over into belief requires patience, gentleness, kindness and above all relationship. These disciples didn’t understand fully who Jesus was until he rose from the dead 3.5 years later. In the course of that time, however,  Jesus proved himself to be a true friend and he patiently journeyed with these friends into belief. Christians of today would do well to follow his example.

Reflections on The Psalms

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C.S. Lewis wrote this book for Christians. In this book he seems to want to take a break from his typical apologetics work, he says “A man can’t always be defending the truth; there must be a time to feed on it.” However, he fails in this endeavour. Whether Lewis tries or not he still manages to put a good word in for Christianity, It’s just who he his. In this case, he does so with some of the most difficult passages in the Bible.

Too Much Anger! The Psalms have a lot of anger, revenge, and “death to the enemy” kind of talk — which seems directly contrary to Jesus’ love for your enemy talk. Lewis points out that at least their anger shows that they took right and wrong seriously. Granted their indignation slipped into unhealthy vindictiveness at times. This admission, according to Lewis, doesn’t hurt the truth or reliability of Scripture. Rather it helps us to see how much God and his people should object to evil and it pinpoints with convicting accuracy our own indifference and dismissal of it as sickness, distraction, or poor choice.

Is God an egomaniac? We all despise the man who demands continued assurance of his own virtue, intelligence or delightfulness. Isn’t this exactly what the Psalms do in relation to God? Not according to Lewis. Lewis observes that men spontaneously praise whatever they value, and they spontaneously encourage others to join them in praising it. The Psalmists in telling everyone to praise God are doing exactly what all people do when they speak of what they care about.

Prophecy is silly. All of the passages that allegedly point to Jesus are suspect, because almost anything can be read into any book if you are determined enough. This point is granted, however, Lewis sees redemption’s grand narrative  as a truth that exists in hints and echoes everywhere, he quotes Virgil and Plato. Certainly they didn’t know of Christ but yet they speak of him and his story in ways that transcend coincidence. It’s like the story of God is all around us, peeking out like flowers in spring time. Even the myths of Balder and Adonis resemble Christ. This is no accident any more than the resemblance between the sun and sun’s reflection in a pond is. The ancients all speak of the same thing they are sure of, but yet don’t fully know. The grand “ah hah” moment for all of them is realized in the coming of Christ. “yes, this must have been what I was talking about” is what they all would say, if given the chance.

What of inspiration? Muslims believe they have the direct word, handed down without human interaction, not so with Christians. The Christian Scriptures are more muddy. What does Lewis say of this? “The total result is not “the Word of God” in the sense that every passage, in itself, gives impeccable science or history. It carries the Word of God; and we (under grace, with attention to tradition and to interpreters wiser than ourselves, and with the use of such intelligence and learning as we may have) receive that word from it not by using it as an encyclopedia or an encyclical but by steeping our selves in its tone or temper and so learning it’s over all message.” Lewis’ description here hardly fit’s into a concise bullet point in a statement of faith. It messy, a tad unclear, perhaps even a bit unnerving — kind of like life.

Quote Worthy: 

If the Divine call does not make us better, it will make us very much worse. Of all bad men religious bad men are the worst.

We delight to praise what we enjoy because the praise not merely expresses but completes the enjoyment.

Christians increasingly live on a spiritual island; new and rival ways of life surround it in all directions and their tides come further up the beach every time. 

A Lousy Life



Even though the flocks die in the fields, and the cattle barns are empty,
yet I will rejoice in the Lord! I will be joyful in the God of my salvation! 
Habakkuk 3:17-18

When absolutely everything that can go wrong goes wrong. It is then that I rejoice the most in the God of my salvation. 

It is in these moments that I reveal that God is not simply a means to an end for me but the end itself.

The idea of worshipping a God only because he made me rich healthy and successful is a great insult to the divine and a sign that I have no real relationship with him.  God is not God in this arrangement. God becomes the servant of my will which is the true deity.      

The clearest evidence that a person has not slipped into self worship by using God is when that  person rejoices in God even when everything has gone wrong. It is in the moments of sorrow and pain that deep joy emerges from the true lover of God. This joy In God stands tall even and especially when the dark shadows of death overshadow us and the ones we love.

 For the Christian,  joy in God explodes forth from the cross. The cross conquers fear and death, selfishness and loneliness, shame and guilt. Everything that truly ruins us has been defeated. We are loved. We are welcomed into God’s family. We are accepted. We are slowly but surely transformed into who we should be. We have a hope that will not dim. This is the deep love of God for us and none of this changes no matter what tragedy befalls us.                  

Sailing from Byzantium (Book Review) Collin Wells

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Big Idea: For a long time historians have viewed the history of the Byzantine empire as little more than a millennium long uninspiring tail of decay. Certainly, if territorial expansion is the measure of success for empires than this assessment would have to be true. However Collin Wells makes the case that the cultural influence of this “forgotten empire” upon it’s three neighbours was and continues to be absolutely massive.

To the West: It was Byzantine humanists that taught the Italians to read and appreciate ancient Greek literature. The rediscovery of Greek thought that inspired the Renaissance happened because Byzantines monks carefully transported and meticulously copied these ancient greek texts for their Latin patrons. Without this investment the renaissance would never have happened

To the East: It was a Byzantine love for rational inquiry which led to the golden age of Islamic Science. As the Arabs conquered Byzantine lands they allowed themselves as illiterates to be taught by their captives. Eventually the Greek approach to gaining knowledge through rational inquiry was reacted against and completely squashed in the muslim world, laying the foundations for some of the more radical elements of Islamic thought that we see today.

To the North: The Byzantine empire managed to spread Christianity to Slavs, Bulgarians, and Russians creating a bond that transcended boarders and shaped the belief system of countless numbers of people.

Little bits of interesting:

  1. My way or the highway — The Byzantines were not very tolerant of variant versions of Christianity scattered around it’s empire. The persecution was so bad that when the Muslims came conquering in the 600’s, many un-orthodox Christians welcomed the invaders as liberators.
  2. Icon’s got to go! — For a long time Byzantine Christians were known for their Icons. Then a debate happened, all these images were actually idolatry it was said. God’s judgment would surely come. No! said the other side the icons are not worshiped as idols they are merely reminders of who we worship. Should they stay or should they go? War was where the decision would ultimately be made. Do we win or lose when we have the icons? They lost some battles, so it was time to burn and bury the icons. Eventually they came back but not for quite a while.
  3. The first bobble heads — In the 5th century, asceticism was all the rage and Simeon of Antioch was its rock star. His claim to fame was a 30 year run atop a 50 foot pole. He was so popular that people traveled all the way from Britain to just to catch a glimpse. Soon budding young entrepreneurs capitalized on the craze by creating and selling commemorative Simeon dolls!
  4. Rationalist inquisition — We’ve all heard about the Spanish Inquisition. Ultra religious people torturing people for not having enough faith. In the Muslim world in the 9th century almost the exact opposite kind of inquisition happened. It was an inquisition that tortured ultra religious people for not having enough reason! The leader, Al ma mun, was enamoured with the rationalist thought of the Greek Byzantines. Science, medicine, philosophy was the way forward for Islam. Muslim hardliners resisted this new openness to reason, so he rounded them up and tortured them until they accepted a more rationalistic doctrine. Significant people were martyred, and it became the rallying cry for a brand of Islam that would staunchly repudiate any kind of rationalism. This anti-reason version of Islam won and from its stream flows sharia law, the Wahhabi, and Osama Bin Ladin.
  5. I love my booze — Vladimir of Russia was tempted to convert to Islam in the 900’s he liked the part about how all carnal desires would be fulfilled in the after life. But he didn’t like the thought of giving up wine in this life “Russians cannot live without wine” he said and began shopping for other religions
  6. Sketchy conversion — God himself must live at the Haggia Sophia, said the Russians who investigated the possibility of becoming orthodox, but even the this dazzling architectural masterpiece in Constantinople wasn’t quite enough to make him and his Russian people convert. What did it was a war. The great Byzantine city was in trouble and needed soldiers. They offered a royal princess’s to Vladimir in marriage if he would fight for them on the condition that he would convert. He did, and Christianity came to Russia thanks to war, politics, and violence.
  7. Fresh Harvest – The Slav’s were the harvest field. Roman Christianity wanted to win them over and so did the Orthodox. They even got in fights over this. The Orthodox won. How? They decided that the Slav’s should hear the gospel in their own language. They helped them write their own language and then translated their liturgies into it. This horrified the Roman church who were certain that the language of the church must remain in latin. They stuck to their guns, and lost the Slavs to the Orthodox.

Christian History in Plain Language (Book Review) Bruce Shelley

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I love history, so I am bias, but I think that even a non-history person would be captivated by this book. Shelley captures well the heart of history, which is a story well told. In this volume it’s the story of Christianity. The glories and wonders of it, as well as the dirty laundry. He knits the whole story together by telling lots and lots of fascinating little stories along the way.  This is not a history book that buries you with mind numbing lists of dates, places and events. Yes, they are in there but covertly woven into incredible, despicable, charming, disgusting, and miraculous stories of real people like you and me.

I know it sounds crazy, it’s a history text book after all, right? but I couldn’t put the book down and I learned so much.

I think it should be pointed out, that Shelley is not interested in glossing over the less glorious side of the Christian story. You will not just find a celebration of what is good in this book about Christianity but also an evaluation and analysis of what was not at all good.

The Purity Principle (Book Review) Randy Alcorn

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For anyone left in our western world still interested in the concept of moral purity this is a helpful little resource.

Big Idea: Purity is always smart, impurity is always stupid. There is such a thing as moral law and it is as sure as the law of gravity. Test the law of gravity by stepping off a cliff you’ll get hurt. Test the law of purity by engaging in impurity you’ll get hurt

What loads of people will disagree with: What is moral purity then? Sex is a privilege inseparable from the responsibilities of the sacred marriage covenant. To claim the privilege apart from the responsibility perverts God’s intention and breaks the law of moral purity.

A lingering uncomfortable truth: Our society has in many respects muted the natural consequences for breaking moral law. We can prevent disease and eliminate the possibility of unwanted children. We can even alter any social stigma connected to sex outside of marriage. However there is no contraceptive for a guilty conscience. Even if the physical and cultural toll has been lessened through science and humanist philosophy, the emotional, psychological, and spiritual toll has not.  The social landscape of our society remains littered with the carnage of broken hearts and broken lives.

Final observations: When it comes to breaking moral law, it rarely if ever, just happens, the battle for moral purity takes place in the mind, and it is lost in one hundred silent secret steps before any large leaps into impurity happen.

Perhaps the three greatest greenhouses for the growth of immorality are anonymity, loneliness, and leisure time. Remove these three from peoples lives, and immorality would sharply decline.

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